More on weaning

Well, it is kinda taking over our lives…

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Weaning – how’s that working out for us?

Fig has been trying solid food properly for about ten days now. By properly, I mean in a more organised and concerted way than we were doing when we started. He was pre-six-months then, so it was just a case of putting a few cucumber sticks in front of him every now and again and seeing what he did with them. Actually, that was really useful, because it gave him practice in picking up sticks of food, and he’s now a bit of an expert on that front. But we’ve been consciously doing a mixture of baby-led weaning and traditional spoon fed mush, and Fig’s really getting into it now.

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First food

As Fig approaches six months, naturally Saul and I have started thinking about weaning: the when and the how, primarily. We’ve decided to try to mainly go baby-led (put stuff in front of him, let him pick it up, put it in his ear, smear it on the walls as he sees fit), but with a bit of spoon and mush* thrown in (probably literally) for good measure.  We have started to put a few bits of fruit and veg in front of him already, just to see what he does with it and whether or not he seems ready to start eating.  For eating, read sucking.  For sucking, read licking.  For licking, read placing on tongue and making a funny face. We began with cucumber.

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Unbunging up baby

It’s winter, colds abound, and I guess we’ve been lucky that Fig hasn’t had one until now. The younger a baby is, the more poorly they seem when they get ill, I think; that didn’t stop me panicking like crazy about our robust little four-month-old when he started really struggling to breath on the way back from the Trafford Centre today.

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A routine question

Before Fig was born, and I’m slightly embarrassed to admit this, I had poured over baby books, and established in my head that without doubt the single most important thing about parenting was getting your child into a routine practically before they even get home from the hospital. I had even written a detailed daily schedule for us, based on what I considered to be practical hours for Saul and I and what the books said Fig, being one of those ‘typical’ babies (bear in mind there’s no such thing), would be like. Reader, I was an idiot.

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I swore I never would…

Before you become a parent, you have a very specific list of the way you definitely will, and definitely won’t, bring up your children. This list will be an amalgamation of things your parents did, things your friends have done, things you have observed complete strangers do in Sainsbury’s, and things you have read about or seen on Supernanny.  But then you become a parent, and all of that goes out the window in a matter of (I’d like to say weeks, but I’ll be honest) days.  Here are the Big Four things I swore I’d never do, and in fact do regularly because I live in the real world.

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